Fundraising for Grown-Ups

Guest post

Do you remember raising sponsorship money when you were at school? Walking door to door, asking neighbours and your parents’ friends to sponsor you for walking so many laps round the field, or doing so many bounces on a trampoline or whatever? Well, that was a kind of fundraising and between you and your classmates you probably raised a few hundred pounds for a good cause.

Now that you’re a grown up, you may feel a little reticent about asking neighbours to sign a form and sponsor you 50p fixed, or 5p a lap. You may be wondering, therefore, how to fundraise for your chosen charity. That’s where social media comes in handy.

The first thing, though, is to check your chosen charity’s rules and guidance about how to fundraise for them. If you want to fundraise for the RSPCA, for instance, they have a wealth of useful things to download, from poster templates and sponsor forms to leaflets and booklets that you can display at your event to help to educate everyone in attendance of how they can help, too.

RSPCA Logo

The RSPCA also have fundraising pages that you can create to support specific projects through RSPCA Choices: you could choose to fundraise to support animals, the people who work for the RSPCA (such as inspectors and vets), specific work (like rehoming and fostering) or work done in a particular location, like your local branch.

All you have to do is choose your project, click to set up a fundraising page and enter your details including a sentence or two about why you want to support that project and how you are planning to do so. Post your fundraising page as a link on your favourite social network site and ask for people to click and sponsor or donate, or to come to whatever event you have planned. The more people who share your post, the more people are likely to join in the fundraising and the more money you could make for the RSPCA.

Doing your fundraising event with official kit will help to inspire the confidence of potential donors, who will more readily accept that their donations are going to go to a good cause rather than into your back pocket: after all, you may be trying to attract sponsorship from complete strangers who won’t know that you are honestly trying to raise money for charity.

If you are not sure about fundraising through social media sites, you could always just print off the material from the website and order other promotional things like stickers and other goodies. Then take them to wherever you usually mix with a lot of people, such as at work, through your children’s schools or social clubs. If you feel strongly about a particular cause or if you can at least explain to people what the money is actually needed for (rather than just as a general donation to the coffers of a large charity) it is much easier to ask for help and people are more likely to donate.

Good luck!

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