Handwriting practise starts at home

Among the founding principles of the UK’s Early Years curriculum, writing and drawing are symbolic behaviours in the development of children’s imagination.  With parents encouraging dramatic play, talking and listening skills develop and form the basic narratives of reading and writing.

Handwriting practise starts at home

Language development at your finger tips

Language development can start with pre-writing skills such as making shapes with your fingers. Picture the steamed-up mirror in the bathroom, make a circle with your finger and encourage your child to copy. This type of tracing around a letter or shape develops hand to eye coordination and can take kids very little time to master. There are countless opportunities such as sand and autumn leaves to encourage this kind of positive learning behaviour.

 Hold the pen right and practise

There are a lot of diverse ways to encourage writing but the choice of pen is important for encourage a good grasp. Handwriting advocates believe it good to help youngsters with their pen/pencil grasp and the wider the better. It has also been noted that getting children to slow down when putting pen to paper helps them to develop accuracy quicker.

Science is on your side

Two researches named Pam A. Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer, wanted to prove or disprove a connection between writing and cognitive progress with older students. Their findings revealed that students that wrote out their notes long hand, rather than typing on a screen, and better recall of the subject after a lecture. Note taking appeared to be a better way of engaging the memory compared to typing on a screen.

Colouring books are good for your health
We’ve all seen the adult colouring book! Grown-ups with felt-tip pens colouring fractals and peacock feathers as a pathway to a mental health detox. In discussions by the Mindful organisation the argument stands that colouring and handwriting can relax and focus the mind. We see a lot of blue screen activity with kids these days but maybe the colouring book is a cheaper and potentially healthier alternative to proactively engage your kids.

Science is on your side

Two researches named Pam A. Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer, wanted to prove or disprove a connection between writing and cognitive progress with older students. Their findings in The Pen is Mightier Than The Keyboard, revealed that students that wrote out their notes long hand, rather than typing on a screen, and better recall of the subject after a lecture. Note taking appeared to be a better way of engaging the memory compared to typing on a screen.

The water boost for handwriting

Water play is associated with developing descriptive vocabulary by expressing temperature difference such as warm, cold and, hot. It is also see as a method to develop the fine motor skills that facilitate pre-writing. This works in two ways. Firstly, there is the shape tracing with wet fingers as noted with sand play and those fingers gripping the plastic tea cup and pouring bath-water tea is helping the grip to develop.

 

 

feature post

Save

Save

Follow:
Share:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge